Church Planting – The Most Critical Decision (Part 1)

Church planting is hard. If you’re a planter, I don’t need to tell you that. In terms of experience, you could tell me a lot more than I can tell you.

My perspective is from someone who sees a lot of planters attempt to launch a church. There are so many important decisions along the way – when you’re getting started, when you’re raising initial support, when you’re deciding on the launch team, when you’re looking for a place to launch and so many more.

Recently, I had a conversation with a church planter that reminded me of the most critical decision most church plants will ever make. You’ve raised initial support and launched successfully. You’ve been in your initial location doing the portable church thing for a while. People are serving and a sense of community has begun to permeate the fellowship of the people who are calling the church home. The church has established momentum and has grown. In fact, it has grown so much the church now has to start thinking about a new home. Maybe even a permanent home.

I know it is hard to say any one decision is more critical than another. However, from my perspective, after a church is launched and becomes viable, no decision is more critical than this one – the decision to move from temporary space to a permanent home. Let me explain.

Space affects momentum. Make no mistake about it. The very reason you would even consider moving is because, if you stay where you are too long, it will affect momentum. The scary thing about this decision is that you have to make it before your capacity reaches the point of actually needing it. Waiting too long to make the call to move can be costly.

The former NY Yankee catcher Yogi Berra gets credited with a lot of sayings that seem like they don’t make sense. But one of them, I completely understand. He said it about a restaurant in St. Louis, but he could have said it about a church. He said, “Nobody goes there any more. It’s too crowded.” At first, you’re thinking “Huh?” It sounds like a contradiction but it’s absolutely true. Once people decide your church is too crowded, momentum will stall. Nobody (new) goes there any more – it’s too crowded.

As a church planter, you didn’t get this far only to let that happen.

In the second part of this post, I’ll explain in more detail and cover the implications of the decision to move to a permanent home.

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